With the current focus on US multinational operations around the world and the pressure to meet globally acceptable and locally effective compliance, companies regularly turn to global employment policies as a tool to manage their local employment-related risks. Often the desire is to house these policies in a single “global” employment handbook. As efficient as it may seem to have a single employment handbook, a truly one-size-fits-all single, global handbook most often is not a realistic option. This paper discusses the potential problem with a single “global” handbook and outlines three approaches to get US multinationals to the same result while fully complying with local laws.

Click here to read the entire article, originally published in Bloomberg BNA.

On the heels of the Second Circuit’s decision that sexual orientation discrimination violates Title VII, advocates for LGBTQ rights scored another victory in federal court. On March 7, 2018, the Sixth Circuit unanimously ruled in EEOC v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. that discrimination on the basis of transgender and transitioning status violates Title VII’s prohibition on sex-based discrimination.

Continue Reading Another Federal Court Victory For LGBTQ Rights–The Sixth Circuit Follows The Lead Of The Second And The Seventh Circuits

Baker McKenzie partner Joe Deng introduces Gil Zerrudo to talk about employment laws in the Philippines and give an overview of what has changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Employers should review their contingent workforce due to greater enforcement
  2. Employers should take stock of talent pipeline to prepare for potential downturn in global economic activity
  3. The Philippines is a good and welcoming country for employers that are looking to expand

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Baker McKenzie partner Ben Ho introduces Nadege Dallais to talk about employment laws in France and give an overview of what has changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. It should become easier for international companies in France to demonstrate that they are experiencing financial difficulties when trying to support economic dismissals.
  2. Damages in connection with unfair dismissals will become a bit more predictable because French law now places both a floor and a ceiling on the amount of damages available.
  3. Employee representation will become more simplified with employee delegates, health and safety committee and works councils being merged into one social and economic committee known as the CSE.
  4. In-house collective bargaining agreements should introduce more flexibility to employers because they will now be able to govern areas that historically were only set by law.

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We are pleased to present The Global Employer Magazine 2018 Horizon Scanner. Our easy-to-digest overview of global and regional trends and developments in global employer and labor law is designed to help equip you for the year ahead.

In this issue, we feature:

  • A global overview of the key trends and developments impacting global employers including nationalism and mobility, the gender pay gap, the rise of the modern workforce
  • Regional checklists for the year ahead and data privacy compliance
  • Regional outlooks looking at how the trending global employment law issues are playing out across Asia Pacific, EMEA, Latin America and North America

Click here to download.

Join us for a breakfast briefing on March 27 in Palo Alto for an update on the latest trends and regulations impacting multinational employers in Latin America. Hear from leading practitioners in five key LATAM jurisdictions – Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela – as we address hot topics that employers are facing right now including:

  • Managing a modern workforce, from contingent workers to outsourcing service models
  • Addressing the gender pay gap, including gender pay legislation and expectations
  • Complying with changes in termination and anti-harassment legislation
  • Predicting the impact of new leadership in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela
  • Preparing for significant labor reform in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico
  • and more!

Click here more details, including how to register.

In our Global Employer Monthly eAlert, we capture recent employment law developments from across the globe to help you keep up with the ever-changing employment law landscape around the globe.

In this month’s issue, we share updates from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Italy, the Netherlands, South Africa, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Click here to view.

Jordan Kirkness and Susan MacMillan in our Toronto office report that the government of Ontario announced yesterday that it will introduce new legislation to require certain employers to track and publish their compensation information.

The proposed legislation is part of the province’s initiative to advance women’s economic status and create more equitable workplaces (the initiative is titled “Then Now Next: Ontario’s Strategy for Women’s Economic Empowerment”). Yesterday’s announcement comes on the heels of last week’s budget plan in which the Canadian federal government outlined proposed proactive pay equity legislation that would apply to federally regulated employers — see here for our article on the proposed federal legislation.

For more on Ontario’s new pay transparency legislation, see here.

Baker McKenzie partner Susan Eandi introduces Rowan McKenzie to discuss  employment laws in Hong Kong and give an overview of what changed in 2017, as well as what we can expect in 2018.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Increase in minimum wage – came through in May 2017
  2. Be aware of what right to reinstatement may end up looking like
  3. Cognizant of potential changes in work hours and overtime for low wage earners
  4. Abolition of the Mandatory Provident Fund offset upon termination and any potential relief that may be provided to employers
  5. Staying ahead of potential changes to immigration policy

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Baker McKenzie partner Susan Eandi introduces Chris Burkett from Toronto to talk about employment laws in Canada and give an overview of what’s changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect in 2018.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Employers must review their workplace health and safety policies to ensure that anti-harassment polices are up to date and that training is in place, particularly around sexual harassment.
  2. Review termination clauses in employment agreements to ensure compliance with ESA and clarity of language and intent.
  3. Implement the minimum wage and equal pay obligations that are now in force.
  4. Be proactive in managing the use of cannabis in the workplace, particularly where accommodation requests come into play.
  5. Prepare for expanding supply chain + ESG transparency and global corporate human rights obligations. If operating globally, ensure you have a policy and due diligence program in place to mitigate adverse human rights impacts and lower risk of exposure to human rights lawsuits and reputational damage.

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneIn | Google Play.