Special thanks to presenters Jeremy Hann (Toronto), Liliana Hernandez-Salgado (Mexico City), Leticia Ribeiro (Sao Paulo – Trench Rossi Watanabe), Maria Cecilia Reyes (Bogota) and Matias Herrero (Buenos Aires).

Our four-part Global Guided Tour for US Multinational Employers webinar series is your passport to ensure that your organization is up to speed on the key labor

Special thanks to guest contributors: Erik Christenson and Melissa Allchin.

Baker McKenzie’s Labor and Employment, Global Immigration and Mobility, and Tax lawyers review the wide variety of legal issues for employers to consider regarding a temporary or permanent remote work opportunity, and provide tips on how employers can offer employees flexibility while remaining compliant

Special thanks to presenters Mirjam de Blecourt (Amsterdam), Nadege Dallais (Paris), Fermin Guardiola (Madrid), Stephen Ratcliffe (London) and Bernhard Trappehl (Munich).

Our four-part Global Guided Tour for US Multinational Employers webinar series is your passport to ensure that your organization is up to speed on the key labor and employment issues affecting business operations in 

Join us for an educational trip around the globe without leaving the comfort of your home office. We know that the pandemic has posed unprecedented challenges for US multinational employers. In addition to keeping your employees safe and maintaining business continuity, it is difficult to keep track of the rapidly changing legal environment for employers

For a company to effectively expand its global footprint, it’s almost always necessary to engage workers on the ground. The legal risks and opportunities in structuring these relationships differ significantly around the world, and the complexity is further compounded by the intersection with other areas of law, including tax, corporate, intellectual property and employment, to

Companies understand the benefits of bringing people together, and prior to COVID-19 many invested in new spaces in major cities to attract talent and encourage collaboration. Now that many workforces are operating remotely, how can employers instill company values and culture, maintain the employee experience, and effective and collaborative teams? How does the possibility of

Special thanks to guest contributors Melissa Allchin and Harry Valetk

Our Labor and Employment, Global Immigration and Mobility, and Data Privacy lawyers discuss vaccine passports — what they are, how countries are already using them domestically and for international travelers, data privacy concerns related to the use of digital health documentation, and what employers should

Most US multinationals conduct regular pay equity audits, but for further insights into promoting equity and removing potential bias in compensation, companies are increasingly exploring adding performance ratings audits to the standard review cycle.

Performance ratings can often have a large impact on an employee’s rate of pay and/or bonus compensation. However, for many companies, performance ratings are discretionary, given by managers without specific guidelines or training to follow and without many (or any) checks and balances. In addition, considerations regarding leveling of job descriptions, both at the time of hire and as employees matriculate, may impact performance ratings. Because the results of a pay audit are only as good as the data inputs, it makes sense to take a closer look at how the underlying data comes to be.


Continue Reading Taking Your Pay Equity Analysis To The Next Level: Performance Ratings Audits

Special thanks to guest contributors Monica Kurnatowska, Bernhard Trappehl and James Brown.

In brief

The EU Commission has proposed a directive that would reinforce the entitlement to equal pay for men and women for the same work, or work of equal value, including by giving employees the right to comparative pay information and by requiring gender pay gap reporting for employers with 250+ employees, amongst other measures. Some EU member states already have aspects of these rules, while others do not, meaning that the rules could be a significant additional compliance burden for some organisations. The rules, if adopted, would be unlikely to come into force before late 2024.

Key takeaways

The EU Commission has proposed a new directive on pay transparency. If adopted, it would:

  • Require measures to ensure employers pay the same work, or work of equal value, equally.
  • Require employers to provide initial salary (or salary range) information to job applicants, pre-interview.
  • Prohibit employers from asking job applicants about salary history.
  • Create a right for a worker to request information about:
  • Their own pay level
  • Average pay levels, broken down by gender and categories of workers doing the same work / work of equal value
  • Require gender pay gap (GPG) reporting for employers with 250+ employees.
  • Create joint pay assessments if:
  • GPG is 5%+ for any category of workers doing the same work or work of equal value, and
  • employer has not justified the GPG.

Based on previous experience, we estimate that these proposals, if adopted, would need to be implemented by sometime in late 2024.


Continue Reading European Union: Commission Proposes Pay Transparency Rules to Secure Equal Pay