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In our latest podcast, Baker McKenzie partner Joe Deng introduces Tomohisa Muranushi to discuss employment laws in Japan and give an overview of what changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Reduce excessive overtime
  2. Encourage greater female participation
  3. Watch out for developments regarding fixed term contracts

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

Multinational employers are facing a new era of globalization characterized by the polarized forces of cooperation and competition ─ a duality that makes for a messy business landscape. Our new report,  Globalization 3.0: How to survive and thrive in a new era of trade, tax and political uncertainty, aims to provide corporate leaders with a greater understanding of key trends so they can anticipate, influence and better prepare for the changing world order.

This report focuses on how the aforementioned forces of cooperation and competition are shaping policies in four key areas:

  • Data privacy
  • Investment
  • Labor and human rights
  • Tax

Alongside helpful insights, the report also identifies actions for companies to consider now to prepare for the next era of globalization.

Click here to view and download the full report.

In our latest podcast, Baker McKenzie partner Carole Spink introduces Lois Rodriguez from Madrid to talk about employment laws in Spain and give an overview of what changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Continued debate on the treatment of permanent versus temporary workers, including the issue of severance entitlements
  2. Debate on requirement to track hours – different obligations for part-and full-time employees
  3. Increased attention to gender pay issues and more generally equal pay rights
  4. EU trade secret directive offers greater opportunities to protect trade secret + the importance of being proactive to benefit from this protection
  5. Implementation of GDPR which goes into effect in May 2018 – companies should make sure they comply with the new data privacy obligations

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

(With thanks to Lois Rodriguez from our Madrid office for preparing this post in collaboration with Yana Komsitsky.)

Before conducting workplace surveillance, employers who want to monitor their workplaces, even if they suspect their employees of stealing or other nefarious activity, should heed the recent European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) judgement in the case of Lopez Ribalda and others v. Spain.

In early January, the ECHR held in favor of five supermarket chain employees who had been dismissed after they were caught stealing on hidden cameras because the cameras had intruded on their right to respect for private and family life.

Continue Reading The European Court Of Human Rights Awards Damages To Five Employees Filmed Stealing From Their Employer

In our latest podcast, Baker McKenzie partner Ben Ho introduces Monica Kurnatowska to talk about employment laws in the UK and give an overview of what changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Brexit – UK employment rights will generally be unaffected in the short term, but there is concern from nationals from other EU states about their right to remain, despite attempt to re-assure them by the government
  2. Gig economy – closer scrutiny on misclassification of workers
  3. Gender pay gap – companies with 250 or more employee in GB, are required to publish key data points relating to the difference in pay between men and women

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

Be sure to download our 15 minute podcast about employment laws in Brazil. Baker McKenzie partner Kerry Weinger introduces Leticia Ribeiro from Sao Paulo to talk about employment laws in Brazil and give an overview of what has changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. With the labor reform, it is time to revisit local practices, policies and agreements, and confirm that they are consistent with the new law
  2. While it is important to adjust to the new provisions of the labor code, it is important to do so with caution as we are hearing that the labor court judges might be a bit resistant to some changes that were recently introduced
  3. With the very near implementation of the eSocial program, multinational employer must be ready to start the required reporting and that the information reported will not create any issues

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

Curious about recent employment law developments in Germany? Download our 15-minute podcast where Baker McKenzie partner Carole Spink introduces Steffen Scheuer from Munich to talk about what changed in 2017 and what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Restrictions to use of temporary workers
  2. Increasing measures to address gender gap issues
  3. Scrutiny by works councils on equity programs granted by US parent companies

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

We put our heads together to come up with some predictions for 2018.

Read the Horizon Scanner for more details but, in a nutshell, we predict:

  1. Multiplying statutory obligations aimed at closing the gender pay gap
  2. A push to become data-privacy compliant before GDPR is effective May 25, 2018
  3. Growing paid leave benefits for families around the globe
  4. A renewed focus to protect company assets globally
  5. Consistent deal growth with a particular bent towards “insourcing” arrangements

Click HERE to get the full picture!

Our firm’s Global Chair, Paul Rawlinson, is currently in Switzerland at the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting.

Paul believes that navigating multi-speed globalization will be the key challenge for business in 2018. We agree. For today’s employers, managing a global workforce requires complying with local labor and employment laws in multiple jurisdictions, staying abreast of rapidly changing regulations, handling the growing demands of labor unions and works councils, and moving talent quickly across borders. Accordingly, we work with multinational businesses to manage all of their employment needs, from day-to-day human resources requirements to critical global business change projects.

Read Paul’s post on the World Economic Forum’s website HERE.