Effective Saturday March 21 at 5:00 PM until the end of April 7, 2020, all Illinois residents are subject to a stay at home order from the Governor of Illinois. Governor Pritzker announced these measures at a 3:00 press conference today, March 20, 2020, at which he stated “I fully recognize I am choosing between

On March 18, 2020, Oak Park, Illinois — one of the closest suburbs to Chicago with a population of approximately 60,000 — issued a “Shelter in Place” order (the “Order”) for all Oak Park citizens and businesses in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This Order comes after a resident was found to have contracted the virus in the western part of the town earlier in the day. The full text of the Order may be found here.

The Order requires all residents to “shelter at their place of residence” from March 20 through and including April 3, although the Order may be rescinded before April 3 or extended beyond April 3. Crucially, all non-essential businesses “[a]re required to cease all activities at facilities located within [Oak Park]” except for the performance of duties necessary for maintaining the value of a business’s inventory, ensuring business security, processing payroll, and attending to employee benefit matters (referred to as “Minimum Basic Operations” in the Order). The Order also imposes broad restrictions on travel. All travel is prohibited unless deemed: (1) “Essential Travel”; or (2) necessary (a) to perform work for an “Essential Business”; or (b) to perform an “Essential Activity.”

There are several important carve-outs in this Order.

First, businesses may continue operations consisting exclusively of employees or contractors performing activities at their own residences. In other words, employees may still work from home even if the employer is not an “Essential Business” (as defined below) and must close its physical office or retail space located within Oak Park. And non-essential businesses may still engage in Minimum Basic Operations as defined above.


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Chicago is the most recent city to adopt a “predictive scheduling” ordinance, the Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance.

Effective July 1, 2020, employers subject to the Ordinance must provide advance notice of work schedules to covered employees. If changes are made to the posted schedule, employers must pay additional wages, “predictability pay,” as a penalty. This penalty applies to both increases and reductions of shifts.


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As detailed in prior posts, in January, the Illinois Supreme Court held that a plaintiff need not plead an actual injury beyond a per se statutory violation to state a claim for statutory liquidated damages or injunctive relief under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). While recent decisions applying BIPA have been largely Illinois-based, the Ninth Circuit recently applied BIPA in Patel v. Facebook to affirm a lower court’s ruling that plaintiffs in the ongoing Facebook BIPA class action alleged a concrete injury-in-fact to confer Article III standing and that the class was properly certified.

The Ninth Circuit is the first federal circuit court to conclude that a plaintiff alleging a BIPA violation has standing for purposes of Article III of the US Constitution. The ruling makes it easier for plaintiffs to certify BIPA class actions, within and outside of Illinois. 
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California is known as one of the most progressive, pro-employee states in the country. But if the last several months are any indication, Illinois is quickly catching up.

Here’s a quick overview of what’s happening in the prairie state:

Illinois Wage Payment and Collection Act   

What’s New? As of January 1, 2019, employers must reimburse employees for all “necessary” expenses. So what’s a necessary expense? Anything required of the employee in the discharge of his/her employment duties that “inure to the primary benefit of the employer.” Computers, cell phones, uniforms, etc. may all constitute “necessary” expenses that the employer is required to reimburse.

Takeaway: Employers should review their policies, job descriptions, and third party contracts to determine which positions/roles may result in necessary expenditures.


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As we previously reported, in January, in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp., the Illinois Supreme Court held that a plaintiff need not plead an actual injury beyond a per se statutory violation to state a claim for statutory liquidated damages or injunctive relief under the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act (BIPA).

(By way of reminder, the Illinois BIPA prohibits gathering biometric data such as fingerprints without notice and consent. It also requires data collectors adopt a written policy and a destruction policy for data which is no longer required.)

In the wake of Rosenbach, dozens more class actions have been filed in Illinois state courts. Following Rosenbach,plaintiffs can seek injunctive relief and statutory penalties under the BIPA on a class-wide basis. Despite the flurry of activity by the plaintiff’s bar over the past several years, Illinois courts have only recently started addressing such claims. The rulings since Rosenbach demonstrate a strong commitment not to deviate from the Illinois Supreme Court’s holding.
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Please join us for a complimentary breakfast briefing in Deerfield, IL starting at 7:30 am, Friday, June 21. The program, approved for D&I CLE, will explore why it is critical for employers to promote a diverse and inclusive workplace and the potential legal ramifications of failing to do so. We will also hear from a

How to bridge the gap between HR and legal to avoid exposure in the US and beyond

Effective HR departments are imperative to the operation of any company and functions including benchmarking and non-solicitation agreements serve an important need. However, increased scrutiny from antitrust regulators means that companies and staff that agree not to poach

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court issued a highly anticipated decision, Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corporate et al., extending the reach of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). BIPA is an Illinois privacy law that regulates the collection, use, and retention of biometric data such as fingerprints, face, and eye scans by imposing procedural requirements on corporations that collect the data. Though not an employment case, the decision impacts employers using biometric time-keeping systems in Illinois.

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