What are the people implications of Brexit under a no-deal scenario compared to what is likely to happen if a deal can be reached?

Download our full analysis of the implications for employees, including the impact on the right to travel and work across the EU, employment rights and social security.

In summary

  • Little change is expected to UK employment rights on 29 March 2019, whether or not a deal is reached.
  • Any new deal which is approved is likely to contain the same people provisions as those set out in the current draft UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement, although this is not guaranteed. We explain those provisions in our full analysis.
  • In a no-deal scenario, EU citizens in the UK will be able to apply to remain in the UK using the New EU Settlement Scheme but it is unclear whether UK nationals working in the EU will benefit from similar protection.
  • If a deal is reached, there will be a transition period during which all EU employment law will continue to apply. After that, despite long-term scope for future watering-down or dismantling of EU-derived worker rights, this is not the current UK government’s stated intention and any future trading agreement may involve some form of continuing commitment to shared employment standards.

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(With thanks to Stephen Ratcliffe and Tony Haque in our London office.)

The UK Cabinet and EU leaders have now approved a draft withdrawal agreement setting out the terms of UK withdrawal from the EU. With the agreement still to be approved by the European and UK parliaments, our London Employment & Compensation team recently released a report analyzing the potential people implications of a “deal” verse “no deal” scenario. Click here to access.

For more Brexit-related news, please visit our Brexit blog or our central Brexit information hub.

In our latest podcast, Baker McKenzie partner Ben Ho introduces Monica Kurnatowska to talk about employment laws in the UK and give an overview of what changed in 2017 as well as what we can expect for the year ahead.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Brexit – UK employment rights will generally be unaffected in the short term, but there is concern from nationals from other EU states about their right to remain, despite attempt to re-assure them by the government
  2. Gig economy – closer scrutiny on misclassification of workers
  3. Gender pay gap – companies with 250 or more employee in GB, are required to publish key data points relating to the difference in pay between men and women

Download now on iTunes | Android | Stitcher | TuneInGoogle Play.

Our Baker McKenzie colleagues in our London office just shared their January 2018 Employment Law Update. Find it HERE.

Highlights include:

  • Increases to statutory payments for time off work
  • Tribunal claims: volume of claims increasing following abolition of tribunal fees
  • Brexit: proposed technical changes to employment laws published
  • Gender pay gap reporting: pressure on employers increases as government indicates that it will publish details of employers who have not yet registered on the government website

For more information, please contact your Baker McKenzie lawyer.

This morning’s announcement that the British public have voted in favor of a so-called “Brexit,” has the potential to be one of the most significant events in recent British history. The precise implications of Brexit will depend upon exactly how the UK’s future relationship with the EU will be structured. We have put together an updated briefing to help businesses with operations in the UK understand how employment law might be affected by the Brexit, identifying the various types of relationships with the EU which the UK may adopt in place of full membership. A copy of the briefing can be found here.