Join us for a lunch briefing on November 12 in Palo Alto as we explore the top 5 trends impacting multinational employers in Latin America.

Hear from leading practitioners in 5 key LATAM jurisdictions – Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela – as we address these key developments:

1. Tips for operating under the new

The bad news is that your company may still be recovering from trying to compile and organize all of the EEO-1 Component 2 pay data for submission by September 30, 2019. The good news, however, is that the EEOC has announced that it will no longer collect Component 2 pay data in the future. (Everyone can let out a collective sigh of relief now!) To the extent they haven’t already done so, companies are still required to submit Component 2 pay data for years 2017 and 2018 this year, but they will not be required to do so on an ongoing basis.

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Join us in our new Palo Alto office for a breakfast briefing on October 30 as we explore the top 5 trends impacting multinational employers in EMEA.

Hear from leading practitioners in 5 key EMEA jurisdictions – France, Germany, South Africa, Spain and the United Kingdom – as we address these key developments:

1. Tips

This summer the U.S. Women’s Soccer team won more than the World Cup – they’ve had tremendous success in garnering public support in their bid for equal pay. However, beyond the star power of Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe, pay equity continues to be a hot button issue for employers in the U.S.

We’re pleased

In May, we gathered nearly 100 inspiring leaders and thinkers from the business and academic world to predict and plan for the future of work. We are delighted to share key messages and insights from our fourth Global Employer Forum in the link below.

However, in case you’re short on time, here’s the tldr:

We are in a period of unprecedented transformation, driven by technological development, globalization and significant demographic changes. Our world is hyper-connected, and the pace of change is rapid, bringing social and political transformation and creating profound global shifts in expectations. Global employers must evolve at speed to meet these disruptive forces head-on and to thrive in this future of work.


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Less than two weeks ago we reported that all employers with 100 or more workers in the US would have until September 30 to provide the EEOC with pay data (read more here).

Then, just days later, on May 3rd, the Justice Department appealed the two rulings resurrecting the Obama-era mandate. Ironically, the appeal

All employers with 100 or more workers in the US have until September 30 to provide the EEOC with pay data as part of the annual workforce data report known as the EEO-1.

On April 25, US District Judge Tanya Chutkan accepted the EEOC’s proposal (more here) to make employers submit their 2018 pay data this fall. She also ordered the EEOC to collect a second year of pay data, giving it a choice between collecting employers’ 2017 data or making it collect 2019 data down the road. Her ruling is expected to impact more than 60,000 employers.


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Last month, we reported that a federal court in Washington D.C. lifted the government’s stay of the revised EEO-1 form that requires companies to submit summary wage data by race/ethnicity and gender. Following the court’s order, uncertainty loomed concerning whether employers would need to include the additional data by the current EEO-1 Report deadline

Today is International Women’s Day. The day marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

In our global gender pay gap thought leadership series, we’ve highlighted the numerous ways governments around the world are taking actions aimed at closing the gap. In the US, the movement to prohibit the practice of inquiring about an applicant’s salary history continues to gain steam. Cities and states across the country have enacted legislation making it unlawful to inquire about prospective employees’ salary history. Proponents of salary history bans argue that using past compensation in future employment decisions perpetuates existing pay disparities among women and minorities.


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