California is known as one of the most progressive, pro-employee states in the country. But if the last several months are any indication, Illinois is quickly catching up.

Here’s a quick overview of what’s happening in the prairie state:

Illinois Wage Payment and Collection Act   

What’s New? As of January 1, 2019, employers must reimburse employees for all “necessary” expenses. So what’s a necessary expense? Anything required of the employee in the discharge of his/her employment duties that “inure to the primary benefit of the employer.” Computers, cell phones, uniforms, etc. may all constitute “necessary” expenses that the employer is required to reimburse.

Takeaway: Employers should review their policies, job descriptions, and third party contracts to determine which positions/roles may result in necessary expenditures.


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To help multi-state employers determine the minimum amount they must pay non-exempt employees, our chart below summarizes state and local increases this year. (Unless otherwise indicated, the following increases are effective January 1, 2019.)

This chart is intended to discuss rate changes that affect employers generally, and may not necessarily cover all industry-specific rate changes.


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On January 5, 2018, the Department of Labor did away with its previous six-factor test and announced a new “primary beneficiary” test to determine whether interns and students working for “for-profit” employers are entitled to minimum wages and overtime pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Employers are required to pay employees for their work, but in some circumstances, interns may not actually be employees under the FLSA, and therefore, can be unpaid. The DOL stated that the new test “allows increased flexibility to holistically analyze internships on a case-by-case basis.”

The new “primary beneficiary” test looks at whether the intern or the employer is the primary beneficiary of the relationship. Several circuit courts, including the Second and Ninth, have previously favored the “primary beneficiary” test, viewing it as being more up to date and aligned with the underlying purpose of an unpaid internship.


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